Architectural Wonders of LA: Schindler House

 
Check out dat grass.  Source: MAK Center for Arts & Architecture

Check out dat grass. 

Source: MAK Center for Arts & Architecture

You could think of the Schindler House as a WeWork building before its time, built for would-be Burners of the 1920's to let their creative juices flow. In 1921, Rudolf Schindler and his wife, Sophie Pauline Gibling, moved to Los Angeles and did what every newlywed couple would do: they designed a house to be shared with their friends, Marian and Clyde Chase. The space has one communal kitchen, shared sleeping porches on the roof, a guest apartment, and four separate bedrooms, one for each individual to “express his or her individuality”...whatever that means.

With a remarkable sense of fluidity and large slabs of glass flaunting extensive gardens from nearly everywhere in the house, the couples successfully created a home that aligned with their progressive social philosophies. The space quickly became a revolving door for socially “left” L.A. elites of the time, ranging from poets to dancers to architects (including legend FLW himself).

The house features a simplistic construction method that gained popularity during the time, which involved cutting the wall studs to standard door height, and adding a multi-layer roof. The result? A simplistic frame with a low ceiling that emits a vibe oddly wedged between caveman dwelling and the mid-century modern style that would prevail in later decades. 



From Wednesday-Sunday 11am-6pm,  visit the Schindler House affordable $7 and express that individuality of yours.

835 N. Kings Road

West Hollywood, CA

The uniquely low-ceilinged frame.  Source: Patricia Kucker, Journal of Architecture, Volume 7, Summer 2002.

The uniquely low-ceilinged frame. 

Source: Patricia Kucker, Journal of Architecture, Volume 7, Summer 2002.

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Schindler House, West Hollywood. #schindlerhouse

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